Seen and liked – paintings by Mark Igloliorte

Work by M. Igliorte

“Work” (Kayait Series), Oil on Plexiglass, by Mark Igloliorte, 2008

Mark Igloliorte, who grew up in the Labrador town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, draws heavily from both Labrador Inuit culture and urban culture in his work.

In the picture below, I noticed the oil painting technique of the interdisciplinary artist of Inuit ancestry from Nunatsiavut who used to go hunting with his father on the weekends. The technique likens the process of applying paint onto a surface to stretching a caribou or seal skin over a frame.

IMG_6532

“Diamond Komatik Box”, Oil mounted on board, by Mark Igloliorte, 2015

 

It has been suggested that the fragile attachment of a painted ‘skin’ may speak to the now Vancouver-based artist’s separation from – and connection to – Nunatsiavut, the Inuit self-governing region in the Atlantic Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

This work is part of his “Visiting Home” series.

 

“In a lot of ways, I look at my series as a way of growing and experimenting,” Igloliorte said in an interview in 2015, “and trying to get as much out of the process of painting as I can. For me, it’s a really good place to be working from: always looking at it as an experiment and always trying to discover something new to work on.”

More about Mark Igloliorte

Mark Igloliorte is an interdisciplinary artist of Inuit ancestry from Nunatsiavut, Labrador. His artistic work is primarily painting and drawing. In 2017, Igloliorte received a REVEAL Indigenous Art Award from the the Hnatyshyn Foundation

His work has been shown nationally and internationally, notably at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Quebec Triennial at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, and as part of the touring exhibition Beat Nation.  He currently lives in Vancouver where he teaches at Emily Carr.

See interview with the artist

More about the rise of Nunatsiavut art, click here.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements