The beauty of cast drawing

I never thought I could enjoy spending hours and hours sketching or painting a cast. Being an aries, accepting slow progress has not really been my forte. However, since becoming a student at the Academy of Realist Art in Victoria, founder and teacher Noah Layne has taught me an important lesson: slow progress is still progress.

“Cast drawing is a wonderful way to work on one’s ability to see and record shapes and sharpen one’s eye”, says Noah. He rightly insists that if you manage to sketch or paint one square cm or inch perfectly, you will be able to do the same on a canvas the size of a skyscraper – it’s just a matter of focus, perseverance and time.

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My third semester at the Academy was amazing, using both comparative measurement and sight-size techniques, then starting to capture a cast of my choice in oil paint.

I never thought I would say this, but I loved it. Every second, every square inch!

Thanks, Noah!

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More information: Noah Layne Academy of Realist Art

 

 

 

 

 

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My latest ‘lemon squares’

Oil painting series ‘lemon squares’ by Daniela Herold (2016)

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“I thought of you in Paris”, my godchild Lilly wrote to me yesterday. “I saw Manet’s lemon – it’s beautiful!”

I couldn’t agree more. Manet’s oil painting of a single lemon from 1880 is ‘lovely’ – for lack of a better word.  For hundreds of years, painters have chosen lemons as objects in their art – for instance Jan Davidsz. de Heem (1606-1684), Luis Melendez, Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) or Edouard Manet in the late 19th century, to name but a few.

But what is it about lemons that they are so often featured in still lifes? Is it their bold colour? Their unique shape and texture? Is it how they reflect light?

All of that is true – and they are simply great fun to paint! Here is my latest series of my ‘lemons squares’, enjoy 🙂

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Further lemons:

Check out Noah Layne’s website – he’s the master of lemons
http://www.noahlayne.com/Lemons,BaggedandBoxed.html

 

 

 

There is always more to learn …

Marcus Aurelius

Last week, I  finished my cast drawing semester under the guidance of Noah Layne at the Realist Academy in Victoria, B.C. Working beside this amazing Canadian artist – who teaches dispassionately and without holding back  –  was a constant reminder to me that there is more to learn beyond whatever proficiency I might already have. And I recognized how little I really know compared with true masters of the arts.

Completing this second part of my apprenticeship with Noah meant fulfillment. Only by exposing myself to someone better than I have I been able to improve my skills and techniques. But technical knowledge alone is not enough: disciplined study can foster a student’s growth in many ways.

Noah has taught me to allow patience and stillness to take over when my impatience was starting to kick in while working on a sketch or a painting.

‘Do not rush’, he said. ‘If you manage to paint one square inch perfectly, you will also be able to perfectly paint a canvas the size of a skyscraper  – just take your time.’

Once I managed to calm my mind, I was able to patiently concentrate on finishing the smallest detail.

More information:
Noah Layne Academy of Realist Art / Victoria, B.C. Canada
www.noahlayne.com

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Charcoal ‘Marcus’ by Daniela Herold at the Noah Layne Academy of Realist Art in Victoria, B.C.

Vancouver Island’s premier Summer Arts event – The Sooke Fine Arts Show

'Lumens' (oil on canvas, 2014) by Daniela Herold

‘Lumens’ (oil on canvas, 2014)
by Daniela Herold

I’m happy to report that my oil painting “Lumens” was selected to be part of the Annual SOOKE FINE ARTS SHOW.

The Sooke Fine Arts Show provides the opportunity for the finest artists from Vancouver Island and BC’s coastal islands to showcase and sell their work. The Show, coming into its 29th year, is Vancouver Island’s longest-running juried fine art show and the Island’s premier summer arts event. The 11-day art show and sale draws more than 8000 art lovers from Canada, the US and abroad. More than 375 works of original island art are on display in a stunning, 17,000-square-foot gallery at the SEAPARC complex on Sooke Harbour.

As I have had the wonderful opportunity to be working with Noah Layne, the founder of the Academy for Realistic Art here in Victoria, over the course of the last 2 years, I will be holding an artist’s talk about a topic close to my heart at the Sooke Fine Arts Show on Tuesday, July 28, 1-2 pm.

“Talent vs Technique – The importance of improving your skills to enhance your natural ability” 

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Noah Layne is an amazing painter and teacher who has inspired many of his students.
Here is a glimpse of my upcoming interview with Noah Layne this Fall.

Emile Zola once said: “The artist is nothing without the gift, but the gift is nothing without work.” Would you agree?

Noah Layne: Absolutely.

In what way were you influenced by such painters as Sargent, Rembrandt or Wyeth?

Noah: I was influenced by these painters by the beauty of their work. The truthfulness of their work, both in technique and in how they followed their heart and soul in painting things that moved them.

You started painting by copying Rembrandt and Winslow Homer paintings when you are just 10 years old.  Did you get any guidance when you studied various painting techniques at such a young age and if so, by whom?

Noah: No, just looking and thinking myself.

Why do you believe in the importance of working from life?

Noah: When I am working directly from life I get to experience whatever I am painting first hand – not filtered by anything other than my eyes and brain.

For me, my art has always been focused around the ability and experience of sitting down, and drawing something and making it look like the thing I’m drawing. That magic of creating a realist image just with your hands, a pencil and your brain. I think it’s a pretty magical thing.

What is your advice to art students when it comes to practice?

Noah: My advice would be to figure out what moves you in art and then go about learning the techniques to make the art you want to make, much like playing music where to express yourself well, you have to learn to play your instrument well. In traditional art, learning technique allows you to then say what you want to say.

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About the Sooke Fine Arts Show

Show opens July 24 – Aug 3, open daily 10 am
closing time:  5pm Saturday July 25, Thursday July 30th, and Monday August 3rd. 7pm all other days

Noah Layne’s blog on art

Noah Layne  is a realist artist who works out of his studio in Victoria, BC, Canada. I have taken a couple of wonderful workshops with him in Fall and was more than impressed. Noah, who has been nominated for a Canadian Webblog Award, is a great teacher and keeps sharing his knowledge with his students in his classes and on his website: http://noahlayne.blogspot.ca/

He recently added a blog on “lemon painting – step by step” – check it out, it’s amazing.