Vancouver Island’s premier Summer Arts event – The Sooke Fine Arts Show

'Lumens' (oil on canvas, 2014) by Daniela Herold

‘Lumens’ (oil on canvas, 2014)
by Daniela Herold

I’m happy to report that my oil painting “Lumens” was selected to be part of the Annual SOOKE FINE ARTS SHOW.

The Sooke Fine Arts Show provides the opportunity for the finest artists from Vancouver Island and BC’s coastal islands to showcase and sell their work. The Show, coming into its 29th year, is Vancouver Island’s longest-running juried fine art show and the Island’s premier summer arts event. The 11-day art show and sale draws more than 8000 art lovers from Canada, the US and abroad. More than 375 works of original island art are on display in a stunning, 17,000-square-foot gallery at the SEAPARC complex on Sooke Harbour.

As I have had the wonderful opportunity to be working with Noah Layne, the founder of the Academy for Realistic Art here in Victoria, over the course of the last 2 years, I will be holding an artist’s talk about a topic close to my heart at the Sooke Fine Arts Show on Tuesday, July 28, 1-2 pm.

“Talent vs Technique – The importance of improving your skills to enhance your natural ability” 

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Noah Layne is an amazing painter and teacher who has inspired many of his students.
Here is a glimpse of my upcoming interview with Noah Layne this Fall.

Emile Zola once said: “The artist is nothing without the gift, but the gift is nothing without work.” Would you agree?

Noah Layne: Absolutely.

In what way were you influenced by such painters as Sargent, Rembrandt or Wyeth?

Noah: I was influenced by these painters by the beauty of their work. The truthfulness of their work, both in technique and in how they followed their heart and soul in painting things that moved them.

You started painting by copying Rembrandt and Winslow Homer paintings when you are just 10 years old.  Did you get any guidance when you studied various painting techniques at such a young age and if so, by whom?

Noah: No, just looking and thinking myself.

Why do you believe in the importance of working from life?

Noah: When I am working directly from life I get to experience whatever I am painting first hand – not filtered by anything other than my eyes and brain.

For me, my art has always been focused around the ability and experience of sitting down, and drawing something and making it look like the thing I’m drawing. That magic of creating a realist image just with your hands, a pencil and your brain. I think it’s a pretty magical thing.

What is your advice to art students when it comes to practice?

Noah: My advice would be to figure out what moves you in art and then go about learning the techniques to make the art you want to make, much like playing music where to express yourself well, you have to learn to play your instrument well. In traditional art, learning technique allows you to then say what you want to say.

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About the Sooke Fine Arts Show

Show opens July 24 – Aug 3, open daily 10 am
closing time:  5pm Saturday July 25, Thursday July 30th, and Monday August 3rd. 7pm all other days

Contemporary Art from North North America – Oh Canada …

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‘Uncharted galvanized hut’ by Chris Millar, 2008.

Curiosity. Humour. Absurdity. 

An epic art exhibition is taking over Calgary: Comprised of more than 100 artworks by over 60 artists and collectives from across the country,  Oh, Canada: Contemporary Art from North North America, is vast in scope and size – so big that no one gallery space in Calgary is large enough to host the entire exhibition. The exhibition, organized by the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA), is the largest survey of contemporary Canadian art ever produced outside Canada! In order to bring this ambitious survey of contemporary Canadian art to Calgary, four local art institutions have partnered to co-represent it (Esker Foundation, Glenbow, Illingworth Kerr Gallery and Nickle Galleries).

Oh, Canada is huge in both scale and scope: 61 Artists. 4 Galleries. 1 Exhibition.

“Over 800 artists from every province and territory were initially considered for ‘Oh Canada’. Following 400 studio visits, 62 artists and collectives were selected, focusing mostly on those less known outside Canada”, says Denise Markonish, the Curator of ‘Oh Canada’. “These artists hail from as fas west as the Yukon, as north as Nunavut and as east as Newfoundland and Labrador; they cross multiple generations, and wok in all media, from painting to performance.”

The overall selection is fabulous! I particularly enjoyed Chris Millar’s work, as the natural born storyteller draws us into his ‘own private universe of wondrous tiny details’, holding our attention while unfolding his outrageous tales and phantasies. Millar’s paintings are dense mixtures of images and phrases, whereas his sculptures are sprinkled with visual clues for the viewer.

Does Oh, Canada define a country as large and intricately layered as Canada? “Not really”, says Markonish, “though it provides insight – through more than 100 artworks – into some of the country’s most noteworthy art practices and ideas, including a deep and continuing interest in the land, craft and identiy politics”.

As for me, a new Canadian since December last year,  Oh, Canada  is but one snapshot among many possibilities, intended to encourage dialogue, debate and a deeper exploration into the breadth and excellence of Canadian art today.

 

 

ABOUT the museum:
Glenbow is Western Canada’s largest museum, with over one million objects in the collection including works of art, cultural artifacts from around the world, and photographs and documents relating to the history of Western Canada. The exhibitions, programs and events are designed to create memorable experiences for all Calgarians.

About Chris Millar
Born in Claresholm, Alberta, Chris Millar grew up in Sherwood Park. He completed a fine arts diploma at Grant MacEwan Community College in 1998, and a bachelor of fine arts in painting at the Alberta College of Art+ Design in 2000.

Life through your lens – Wildlife photographer of the year 2013

Mark Steichen (Luxembourg) Badger dream scene

Presented for a third year with all new photographs, this visually striking exhibition from the Natural History Museum, London (NHM), showcases the world’s best wildlife and nature images.

With 100 new photographs found in 18 categories, visitors to the Royal British Museum in Victoria, B.C. can now enjoy the wonders of nature through the lenses of prize-winning photographers. When I visited the museum yesterday, I was truly impressed by the selection of photographs, beautifully displayed in sleek back-lit installations, each photo and accompanying caption telling the inspirational, astonishing and sometimes humorous stories of our fascinating natural world.  The exhibition runs until April 6, 2014.

“An image can alter the way we see, think and feel. Whether captured in the most remote wilderness or taken in the intimacy of your own backyard, a truly great image of nature can change our world view forever.” (NHM London).

To mark 50 years of the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, the NHM wanted even more young photographers to get involved, offering three age group categories for images of any subject matter covered in the adult competition.

‘It takes courage to put your photos forward, but the rewards for those who do are enormous’, says Jim Brandenburg, chair of the jury. ‘When I won Wildlife Photographer of the Year 25 years ago, it opened doors for me. The publicity it generates is astonishing, so I really want to encourage every professional and dedicated amateur to think about entering. It can be a career-defining move.

For almost 50 years, Wildlife Photographer of the Year has pushed boundaries. ‘In the 60s we raised wildlife and nature photography from a simple scientific record into an art form’, says Jim Brandenburg. ‘In the 80s we conveyed environmental and conservation issues through a single image of startling clarity. And in this new century, by using technology to explore nature more deeply, we’ve piqued global curiosity with new ways of seeing a world otherwise lost in a blink. Now, as we launch our 50th competition, we are setting the stage for the future.’

More information on the website of the Natural History Museum in London, and the Royal BC Museum